Voting Like a Christian This Saturday

Politics is boring. That was definitely my view growing up. I’d say it’s the view of most young Australians—except for a few vocal friends in our newsfeeds, maybe. (I might be one of them. If so, I’m sorry. I hate being ‘that guy’).

For the most part, we Aussies feel the same about politics as we do about religion. In other words, awkward. Not sure what others will think if we speak up. Wary of of the consequences. Heck, it took me a lot of courage to publish this blog.

“Politics is boring. That was definitely my view growing up.”

But I’m not sure that’s God’s intention for believers. In 1 Timothy 2:1-4, Paul wasn’t afraid to talk about politics or religion. He seemed to think both are important—and both are connected:

“I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. This is good, and pleases God our Saviour, who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.”

Three words stand out to me here as I prepare to vote on Saturday—three words that I think can help Christians vote ‘Christianly’, if that’s a thing. Here they are.

1 .  K I N G S

We don’t have a king. We have a Prime Minister. Big deal. Actually, it is.

Until a couple centuries ago, every person from the dawn of time found themselves ruled by someone they didn’t choose, and probably wouldn’t if they’d had a say. Good leaders were the exception—tyranny was the rule.

I can’t express how thankful I am to be born into a democracy. On Saturday, I along with everyone else in my electorate will get a green piece of paper. The person the majority of us choose will spend the next three years in Canberra—in the House of Representatives—representing us and our concerns.

“Who we send to Canberra really matters.”

Australia has 151 of these representatives. If a majority are from the same political party or alliance, they get to choose one of their own to lead the country. This year, that will be either Scott Morrison or Bill Shorten.

Stay with me here. This is important.

Democracy has ‘checks and balances’ to make sure bad laws aren’t easily passed. One of these is the Senate. It’s a seperate house of parliament, made up of 76 members from around the country, who have to approve any change in law suggested by the other house. These are the people you’ll be voting for on your white piece of paper.

Who we send to Canberra really matters. They shape the law that governs us. This is why it’s so important that we pray for them—whoever they are, whatever views they have.

2 .  G O D L I N E S S

If the people we send to Canberra shape our country, we owe it to ourselves to know who we’re voting for and the values they stand for. After all, God says here that he wants us to have leaders who promote godliness.

What does godliness look like in 21st century Australia? It looks like lots of things. Strong marriages and families; justice for those crying out for it; good stewardship of the environment; help for those who can’t help themselves; the freedoms that make democracy work in the first place. The list goes on.

Sadly there are no parties that do all of these things well. Christians find themselves either voting “left” for justice and the environment—or “right” for family values and freedoms.

Most of us long for a party that will represent all of these concerns well. The Bible tells us that it’s coming, but we don’t know when the Prince of Peace will return to establish his kingdom. Until then, we have some choices to make.

“We owe it to ourselves to know who we’re voting for and the values they stand for.”

Here’s how I’ve resolved it. I care deeply about justice and the environment. I recycle, I chat and give to the homeless, I like to buy local and ethical, I eat a plant-heavy diet, I minimise my waste, I try to give generously to the poor, and I live with an open heart to people of other cultures and creeds.

Lots of my concerns about justice and the environment can be addressed by my own choices, with my own money, within my own circle of influence. Not all, but lots.

Voting “left” on these issues will help increase foreign aid, open Australia’s borders, and better sustain the environment. It will make me feel better—but I’ll be using other people’s money and resources to do it. This isn’t actually as generous as it seems on the surface. Far better that I first practice care and generosity with the things that are mine.

“Voting left will make me feel better—but I’ll be using other people’s money and resources to do it.”

The godliness I can’t so easily influence are these other issues—namely, family values and freedom. Let’s start with just one example. In Australia, 70,000+ abortions take place every year. It’s staggering to think that the unborn have only a 3 in 4 chance of making it out of the womb alive.

In looking at Australia’s major parties, sadly a Labor-Greens alliance is unconcerned about the unborn’s right to life. In fact, Labor is pushing to make abortion free and accessible up to birth throughout Australia, threatening to deny funding to public hospitals that refuse.

If I have to choose between the environment and human beings, then as a Christian I will choose human beings who are made in God’s image. If I’m serious about promoting justice and helping those who can’t help themselves, I must lend my vote to these precious little ones facing their silent holocaust.

3 .  S A V E D

But I have other concerns that are beyond my ability to influence in day-to-day life. Australia’s freedoms are so, so precious. If they disappear, democracy disappears with them. Consider the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which says:

“Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.”

This is why, as much as I didn’t like Israel Folau’s Instagram posts, all Australians should be horrified when anyone loses their job for expressing a tenet of their mainstream religious faith.

“Australia’s freedoms are so, so precious.”

We’re used to thinking of our freedoms as a given, but they are not. In small bubbles of the world, for bubbles of time that can be measured in just centuries, these freedoms have existed. Apart from that, they have not. Preserving them must always be one of the main projects of democracy.

Sadly, Labor and the Greens have shown contempt for these freedoms as well.

There are five main equality rights recognised in international law: race, age, disability, sex and religion. The only one not protected in Australian law is religion.

“If these freedoms disappear, democracy disappears with them.”

With religious discrimination on the rise in Australia, Scott Morrison’s Liberal party has promised to introduce a much-needed ‘Religious Discrimination Act’ if they win on Saturday.

On the other hand, Labor and the Greens have set themselves against religious schools, hoping to take away their right to choose staff who will teach their values. This follows on from an attempt by Labor last year to change the Sex Discrimination Act so that any place of worship could be taken to court for teaching their thousands-of-years-old beliefs. This is a staggering shirtfront on freedom.

My concerns about religious freedom might sound selfish, like I’m just trying to protect Christians. But in truth, the erosion of these freedoms is bad for everyone regardless of their faith, and it’s terrible for civilisation.

“Preserving our freedoms must always be one of the main projects of democracy.”

More than that, it’s terrible for the gospel. 1 Timothy tells us to seek godly leaders so that we’re free to proclaim the gospel, that all people might have a chance to be saved and come to a knowledge of the truth.

If we Christians believe our own message, surely we want this freedom preserved—not merely for our own sake, but for all those God longs to save.

I’m convinced that religious freedom and right to life for the unborn are two of the most crucial issues come Saturday. In my everyday life, I’m limited in what I can do to influence these issues. But I can use my vote.

“If we Christians believe our own message, surely we want freedom of religion preserved.”

So I’ve emailed all the candidates who will be on my green and white papers this weekend. (It was so easy—do it for your electorate here). I’ve asked them where they stand on these issues, and I will rank them accordingly.

This is how I’ve resolved to vote like a Christian on Saturday. It’s not a perfect plan, and I don’t expect all Christians to agree. But I’d love to hear your thoughts.

I’ve got some big writing and travel adventures planned for 2019. If you’d like to stay updated every once in a while by email newsletter, let me know here.

8 comments

  1. happysnapperblog · 9 Days Ago

    Thanks for taking the time to write this blog, and for your courage in publishing it. I’ve already voted (in pre-poll), but was interested to read your thoughts. I agree with you 100% – this is no time for us to be complacent, or resentful, or careless with our precious vote. What an opportunity we have, and what a privilege it is to be allowed a say in who forms our government. Thank you, Kurt, for adding clarity to this process. You are a gifted teacher! Keep it up…I really appreciate you sharing your insights!

    Like

  2. Rozzziebee · 9 Days Ago

    Thanks for this.

    Like

  3. Anonymous reader · 9 Days Ago

    Hey, a nice post, you are a thoughtful person. I really think you would enjoy the blog unqualified reservations, for its vast, poetic and striking insights into history and government.

    Like

  4. Anonymous reader · 9 Days Ago

    Food for thought.
    “…a simple personal strategy that anyone who wants real political change can follow is this: begin an unconditional and permanent boycott of all normal, i.e., non-true, elections. Don’t vote until you have a true election to vote in. Whoever or whatever is on the paper, you’re just voting yes to [the giant failure that is our government] as it is today.

    Like

  5. Erin · 9 Days Ago

    Great article. Really well thought out and balanced. Thanks! Interesting you don’t mention the Australian Conservatives as a valid option for those wanting to vote for people who will fight to uphold the rights of the unborn, religious freedom rights and a whole host of other Biblical values. (I know many voters find their stance on the environment a bit disappointing / lacking so I know nothing’s 100% perfect).

    Like

  6. J. Jay · 8 Days Ago

    Hi Kurt,
    Bless you brother for posting this important message. I’ll be sharing it out. You’ve certainly made it a lot clearer for the ignorant or confused lots. God bless.

    Like

  7. Del · 8 Days Ago

    Whilst I was interested to read your thoughts on personal versus governmental impact it is not possible for us to live in a compassionate nation led by leaders with a track record of self or political interest. Voting for the “moral” choice so our society looks closer to the judeo-christian ideal of strong families is flawed as outside of depedance on Christ you can not live a righteous life. If the pharisees had been “elected” the jews would have been no closer to salvation. Abortion is tragic and the concept of 38 week abortion without medical reason and the removal of any controls surrounding it is abhorrent and has far reaching and consequences. Despite my instict to vote for the life of the unborn child this is ultimately a state issue as it is emcompassed in state health legislation. A right leaning federal government won’t effect the legislation as much as we are being led to believe. On the other hand matters of foreign policy and immigration are federal issues, as is the national response to climate change. Currently I am undecided, but which ever way I vote I will be praying for God to deliver us from the consequences of my decision. Grace and peace.

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  8. Therese Richards · 6 Days Ago

    I heard Tim Costello speak at the Justice Conference 2018 He said ‘Don’t go left or right, go deeper ‘ I think Jesus demonstrated this, going deeper to the heart of issues. I don’t agree with you, Kurt, we can make an impact on abortion rates but it will take a lot more than voting for one party or another. It will cost us time and resources, being willing to walk with someone through difficult times. And as for religious freedom? Christians have always shared their faith, whether they had the ‘freedom’ to do so, and often with dire consequences. I voted for Labor because I want to see a more just society in Australia and action on climate change (recycling is a great start but to make the necessary changes will need new direction in policy)
    Thanks for reading my thoughts

    Like

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